GI 2015

New Website and Genetic Improvement 2016

Update: We are running the second international workshop on GI at GECCO 2016.

A website is available for GI 2016: http://geneticimprovementofsoftware.com

The domain geneticimprovement2015.com will be kept alive until September 2016, when it will be folded into the above site.

In the meantime, one of the GI 2015 organisers, Justyna Petke, is organising  a special issue of the GPEM journal on GI! The CFP is below. See also the PDF from Springer.


gilogo

 

The First International Genetic Improvement Workshop (GI-2015) was held in Madrid, Spain, during the Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO-2015), July 11-15, 2015.

Journal Special Issue

One of the GI 2015 organisers, Justyna Petke, is organising  a special issue of the GPEM journal on GI! Here’s the CFP. See also the PDF from Springer.

Call for Papers: GPEM GI Special Issue

Genetic Improvement is the application of evolutionary and search-based optimisation methods to the improvement of existing software. For example, it may be used to automate the process of bug-fixing or to minimise bandwidth, memory or energy use. Genetic programming can use human-written software as a feed stock for GI and is able to evolve mutant software tailored to solving particular problems. Other interesting areas are automatic software transplantation, as well as “grow-and-graft” genetic programming, where software is incubated outside its target human written code and subsequently grafted into it via genetic improvement.

Work on genetic improvement has resulted in several awards, including three “Humies”, awarded for human-competitive results. This includes the bug fixing work that led to the construction of the GenProg tool [1]. More recently, genetic improvement was able to automatically transplant new functionality into existing software [2], which resulted in a ACM SIGSOFT Distinguished Paper Award at ISSTA 2015.

Scope: We invite submissions on any aspect of genetic improvement, including, but not limited to, theoretical results and interesting new applications.  Suggested topics include automatic:

– bandwidth minimisation
– latency minimisation
– fitness optimisation
– energy optimisation
– software specialisation
– memory optimisation
– software transplantation
– bug fixing
– multi-objective optimisation
– trading between quality and non-functional properties

Important Dates:
GPEM Special Issue Submission Deadline: 19 December 2015
First Reviews: March 2016

Paper Submission:
Authors are encouraged to submit high-quality, original work that has neither appeared in, nor is under consideration by, other journals.

Springer offers authors, editors and reviewers of Genetic Programming and Evolvable Machines a web-enabled online manuscript submission and review system. Our online system offers authors the ability to track the review process of their manuscript with straightforward log-in and submission procedures, and it supports a wide range of submission file formats.

Manuscripts should be submitted to: http://GENP.edmgr.com.
Choose “ Genetic Improvement ” as the article type when submitting.

Guest Editor: Justyna Petke, University College London, London;  j.petke@ucl.ac.uk

References:
1  “A Systematic Study of Automated Program Repair: Fixing 55 out of 105 Bugs for $8 Each” (ICSE 2012) by Claire Le Goues, Michael Dewey-Vogt, Stephanie Forrest* and Westley Weimer (University of Virginia, University of New Mexico*)
2 “Automated Software Transplantation”  (ISSTA 2015) by Earl T. Barr, Mark Harman, Yue Jia, Alexandru Marginean and Justyna Petke (University College London)


Thank you!

Thank you to everyone who attend GI 2015! It was a great workshop, and we all had a wonderful time in Madrid. So many great papers and ideas and discussions; it feels like there are some really exciting times to come in GP.

Slides will be available online as and when we receive permission from the relevant authors.

We are now discussing the organisation of GI 2016, which we will propose to take place with GECCO 2016 in Denver, Colorado. Hope to see you there!

Original Call for Papers

We invite submissions that discuss recent developments in all areas of research on, and applications of, Genetic Improvement. The workshop also provides an opportunity for researchers interested in GI to exchange ideas and find out about current research directions in the field and receive guidance on the application of GI to their problem domain. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, using genetic improvement to automatically:

  • fix bugs
  • improve efficiency
  • decrease memory consumption
  • decrease power consumption
  • transplant new functionality
  • specialise software

Lately there has been enormous interest in the use of evolutionary and genetic search in optimising aspects of software engineering. For example, since 2002 there has been an SBSE track at GECCO. More recently there is a dedicated SSBSE conference. Indeed we now see regional conferences and workshops featuring or even dedicated to Search Based Software Engineering starting (in China, Brazil and now the USA).

Including “to appear”, since 2000, there have been more than 70 papers in this area and interest is growing. Since 2009 there have been three human competitive awards (Gold, Silver and Bronze) presented at GECCO and two best papers, including the International Conference on Software Engineering and GECCO.

Whilst SBSE has traditionally been applied to software engineering problems there has been great interest in using it, particularly genetic programming, on software itself.

Genetic Improvement (GI) is the application of evolutionary and search-based optimisation methods to the improvement of existing software. The technique was first applied to optimise and find compromises between non-functional properties of software, such as execution time and power consumption. This work lead on to automated bug fixing in commercial software. More recently, it has been shown that GP can use human written software as a feed stock for GP and is able to evolve mutant software dedicated to solving particular problems. Another interesting area is grow and graft GP, where software is incubated outside its target human written code and subsequently grafted into it via GP.

Submission and Publication Details

We invite submissions of papers, up to 8 pages in ACM (Association for Computing Machinery) format, as well as 2-page position papers on GI. Please see the GECCO 2015 information for authors for further details. Papers do not have to be anonymised. All papers should be submitted in PDF format and e-mailed to:

[email address no longer in use]

All accepted papers will be presented at GI-2015 and will appear in the GECCO workshop volume.

Workshop Chairs

William B. Langdon w.langdon@cs.ucl.ac.uk
David White david.r.white@glasgow.ac.uk
Justyna Petke j.petke@ucl.ac.uk